ABOUT THE BOOKS

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Coffee Cup Stains

Thoughts from an Autistic Poet

Life is complicated, plain and simple.

What we see is not what anyone else sees. We see a red rose, but no one else sees that same red, for no one else has our eyes. And that’s life. We rely heavily on our five senses—taste, smell, touch, sight, and hearing—but only we can taste, smell, feel, see, or hear how we do.

Through the pages of Coffee Cup Stains: Thoughts from an Autistic Poet, readers will tread through a rich landscape of emotion and observations as seen and felt by wordsmith Joy Olree.

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Old Thoughts for a Modern Age

More Poems from an Autistic Poet, Now with multiple sclerosis

Life is complicated and unpredictable, I have Asperger’s and MS, but I refuse to believe I was born just to live a while then die. I am not the result of a Big Bang, nor did I come from a monkey. I believe, God, created the universe and everything in it, then he created Adam and Eve who were fruitful and multiplied until, well here I am. My new book of poems is the result of my reading and studying the Bible and my personal opinions of human life based on how humans act you don’t have to agree with me, you have freewill just like me.

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Midnight Confessions

The World as Seen Through the Eyes of an Autistic Poet with MS

In Midnight Confessions, poet Joy Olree, a self-described autistic poet with MS, presents a collection of user-friendly verse reflecting on her experiences with the world and her readings and studies of the Bible. She offers her opinions on a wide range of topics and invites disagreement and discussion.

Midnight Confessions

In the twinkling of an eye they came, the memory snatchers.
First it was the short-term memories, then the medium ones.
As time went by, more memories seem to leave, but she never
forgot her God and she never did not pray. I put my hand on
her bed as she breathed her last breath. I prayed, “Thank you,
Lord, for making it possible for me to be there.”

As I sit here in the lighted room, the dark outside, I miss my
stepmom. Tomorrow is Christmas, a time of celebration, and I
think to myself, Do I have anything to celebrate? Most of my
family has died. I still have the children and the grandchildren.
I guess I am blessed, and is that not the way of life? Us older
folks die, and the young take our place, unless there is some
unforeseen unexpected tragedy.

But I have much to be thankful for this Christmas. See, because
of my decision to take care of my stepmom at the nursing home,
I now have a new set of friends. A nursing home full of friends.
Thank you, stepmom and God, for making this possible.
Merry Christmas and a happy New Year, humanity.

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